Facebook, Google and other big tech giants are about to face a ‘reckoning,’ state attorneys general warn

Some of the country’s most influential state attorneys general are signaling they’re willing to take action against Facebook, Google and other tech giants, warning that the companies have grown too big and powerful — and that Washington has been too slow to respond.

For many of these top law enforcement officials, the fear is that Silicon Valley has amassed too much personal information about Web users and harnessed it in a way that’s jeopardized people’s privacy and undermined competition, often without much oversight.

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Google Tracks Users in Incognito Mode

Google competitor Duck Duck Go released a study showing that Google gives users personalized search results, even when a user goes into “incognito mode.” Dr. Robert Epstein, a Ph.D. psychologist who focuses on search engine manipulation, drew the logical conclusion Duck Duck Go refused to state.

“The incognito mode is a lie, that’s what they found,” Epstein, whose research features prominently in the recent film “The Creepy Line,” told PJ Media on Wednesday. “The kind of search results they were getting from people in incognito mode and in normal mode were extremely similar, and of course the results that one person got were extremely different than the results that another person got.”

“That’s another way of saying that incognito mode is a lie. It’s an illusion,” the psychologist explained. “They didn’t say that, but that’s what they found.”

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France fines Google nearly $57 million for first major violation of new European privacy regime

Google has been fined nearly $57 million by French regulators for violating Europe’s tough new data-privacy rules, marking the first major penalty brought against a U.S. technology giant since the regionwide regulations took effect last year.

France’s top data-privacy agency, known as the CNIL, said Monday that Google failed to fully disclose to users how their personal information is collected and what happens to it. Google also did not properly obtain users’ consent for the purpose of showing them personalized ads, the watchdog agency said.

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Google Tracks Users in Incognito Mode, Study Finds

Google competitor Duck Duck Go released a study showing that Google gives users personalized search results, even when a user goes into “incognito mode.” Dr. Robert Epstein, a Ph.D. psychologist who focuses on search engine manipulation, drew the logical conclusion Duck Duck Go refused to state.

“The incognito mode is a lie, that’s what they found,” Epstein, whose research features prominently in the recent film “The Creepy Line,” told PJ Media on Wednesday. “The kind of search results they were getting from people in incognito mode and in normal mode were extremely similar, and of course the results that one person got were extremely different than the results that another person got.”

“That’s another way of saying that incognito mode is a lie. It’s an illusion,” the psychologist explained. “They didn’t say that, but that’s what they found.”